Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Craft: Binary Code Bracelets/Necklaces/Keychains

One of the crafts listed in the CSLP manual for the Fizz Boom Read! season was all about binary code. This one caught my eye as my husband loves computers and coding, and... well... I'm a nerd too...

In short, binary code is a way of writing letters and numbers and symbols using an 8-digit string of 0's and 1's. For example, the uppercase letter "A" is written 01000001. Using black beads for 0 and white beads for 1, with colors in between for spacing, we were able to create bracelets, necklaces, and keychains with coded messages.

I offered this program for my teens, but it could easily be something for elementary kids to do too. Most kids wrote their names or initials, a few middle school girls wouldn't share whose name they were writing. :)
The keychain spells "Carrie", and I made the
blue necklace for my daughter "Abby".


Monday, August 11, 2014

Storytime: Movement/Kinetics

Age: 2-5 years
Time: 30 minutes

Sticking with the Fizz Boom Read! CSLP theme, I have chosen seven science topics for our summer. This was our last week, we talked about movement & kinetics!


1) What's the weather? 
I made a weather chart for week one of summer reading, and am starting each week this summer talking about the current weather. We sang this little song to go with it, to the tune of Oh My Darling Clementine:

What's the weather, what's the weather,
What's the weather everyone?
Is it windy, is it cloudy, is there rain, or is there sun?


2) Mr. Sun - Raffi
It had been another rainy couple of days, so we sang our song to bring the sun back out again. I use a combination of motions from Jbrary and Raffi himself.

Oh Mr. Sun, Sun, Mr. Golden Sun (make big sun with arms over head)
Please shine down on me (wiggle fingers and come down, kind of like rain actually)
Oh Mr. Sun, Sun, Mr. Golden Sun (make big sun with arms over head)
Hiding behind a tree (hide eyes with hands)

These little children are asking you (point at self with thumbs)
To please come out so we can play with you (hands make "come here" motion)
Oh Mr. Sun, Sun, Mr. Golden Sun (make big sun with arms over head)
Please shine down on me (wiggle fingers and come down)


3) Introduce science topic: movement 
We listed all of our previous science topics of the summer, and everyone was sad this was our last week. I didn't go into a lot of detail about kinetics, just made mention of how our bodies are able to do some pretty cool motions, and how our storytime today would be mostly songs and action stuff. I had rearranged the room, taking out the craft tables, to allow room for us to move!


4) These Are My Glasses - Laurie Berkner
We sing this every week before reading our first book. I start by asking them to show me their glasses and their book so that they remember the signs. We sing it through twice, then I ask them to put their "books" in their lap while we read our first book.

These are my glasses (make the letter o with each hand)
And this is my book (hands together)
I put on my glasses (put "glasses" over eyes)
And open up the book (open book hands)
Now I read read read (hold book up in front of face like reading)
And I look look look (put glasses over eyes and look around room)
I put down my glasses and… (lower glasses)
WHOOP! Close up the book. (clap as if closing a book quickly)


5) How Can You Dance? - Rick Walton
I paperclipped a bit in this book to only read the pages that included motions kids can actually do. Their favorite was dancing like a snake. :)


6) Shake Your Sillies Out - The Wiggles, Yummy Yummy


7) The Goldfish Song - Laurie Berkner, The Best of the Laurie Berkner Band


8) Head Shoulders Knees and Toes


9) Hokey Pokey
We did right arm, left arm, right leg, left leg, head, whole self, tongue (by request - they must have remembered my 5 senses storytime!). Afterward I pointed out to parents how I was using my other arms/legs. Kids' natural instinct is to mirror what they see, so then they were using their correct side.


10) Stretch - Doreen Cronin
The kids stretched with the dog during the first half of the book. Then we all sat down to finish it.


11) We Are the Dinosaurs - Laurie Berkner, Whaddya Think of That
I always save this one for last, so we can get the biggest roars out of the kids and they don't have to be afraid of being quiet in the library. :)


I closed with a few announcements about fall storytime, encouraging the adults to keep reading to their kids, and letting them know about the free books they would receive that day for completing our Summer Reading Program. And that's the end! I made it through my second summer! :)



Other movement ideas:
Bounce - Doreen Cronin
Wiggle - Doreen Cronin
Dance With Me - Charles R. Smith Jr.



Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Science Craft: Tornado in a Bottle

I've seen a number of different recipes for a tornado in a bottle all over Pinterest. Many used two bottles connected together, but for 100 kids I just didn't want to mess with that. I tried a few that included dish soap, and while the bubbles showed off the swirling, it eventually got too bubbly to see. I then found some that used colored lamp oil, which was REALLY cool, but that stuff was too expensive for 100 kids. I went with vegetable oil instead.
Each kid needed:
  • 1 bottle of water (I initially asked for donations of empty bottles, but didn't get enough, so we just bought a few cases so they already had water in them)
  • 1 drop of food coloring (any more and it would be too dark to see)
  • 25ish drops of oil (probably could have used more, I was afraid I would run out but we never even came close)
  • a sprinkle of glitter
I had a volunteer hot glue the tops on once everything was in the bottle.

It took most kids a few tries, but eventually they all were able to see the tornado. I heard sooooo many "WOW!"s that day. :)



Monday, August 4, 2014

Storytime: Light

Age: 2-5 years
Time: 30 minutes

Sticking with the Fizz Boom Read! CSLP theme, I have chosen seven science topics for our summer. This week we looked at light!


1) What's the weather? 
I made a weather chart for week one of summer reading, and am starting each week this summer talking about the current weather. We sang this little song to go with it, to the tune of Oh My Darling Clementine:

What's the weather, what's the weather,
What's the weather everyone?
Is it windy, is it cloudy, is there rain, or is there sun?


2) Mr. Sun - Raffi
I told the kids we would be talking about light today, and how we get a lot of light from the sun. I used a combination of motions from Jbrary and Raffi himself.

Oh Mr. Sun, Sun, Mr. Golden Sun (make big sun with arms over head)
Please shine down on me (wiggle fingers and come down, kind of like rain actually)
Oh Mr. Sun, Sun, Mr. Golden Sun (make big sun with arms over head)
Hiding behind a tree (hide eyes with hands)

These little children are asking you (point at self with thumbs)
To please come out so we can play with you (hands make "come here" motion)
Oh Mr. Sun, Sun, Mr. Golden Sun (make big sun with arms over head)
Please shine down on me (wiggle fingers and come down)


3) Introduce science topic - light
I hung a big piece of posterboard, and wrote the sun at the top. Then I asked the kids where else we get/see light. Both groups came up with a pretty good list!


4) These Are My Glasses - Laurie Berkner
We sing this every week before reading our first book. I start by asking them to show me their glasses and their book so that they remember the signs. We sing it through twice, then I ask them to put their "books" in their lap while we read our first book.

These are my glasses (make the letter o with each hand)
And this is my book (hands together)
I put on my glasses (put "glasses" over eyes)
And open up the book (open book hands)
Now I read read read (hold book up in front of face like reading)
And I look look look (put glasses over eyes and look around room)
I put down my glasses and… (lower glasses)
WHOOP! Close up the book. (clap as if closing a book quickly)


5) Night Lights - Susan Gal
I liked how this one showed lots of places where we see light, like we had just listed. It was simple enough we could have even used it as a closing book (I typically pick a longer one for our first book), but it was a good way to introduce our topic.


6) Song - Moon Moon Moon - Laurie Berkner
We had already mentioned the sun, and the previous book ended with the moon and stars. This song is on Laurie's Victor Vito CD. I started with the motions from Sunflower Storytime, and then changed a few...

Moon, moon, moon (form arms in circle over head) 
Shining bright (wiggle fingers like they are sparkling) 
Moon, moon, moon (form arms in circle over head) 
My night light (act like turning off a light) 
Moon, moon, moon (arms in circle over head) 
I can see (point to eyes)
Moon, moon, moon (form arms in circle over head)
You’re taking care of me (hands over heart) 

Look up, it’s the moon (point up with right hand and look up) 
Look up, it’s the moon (point up with left hand and look up) 
Look up, it’s the moon (point up with both hands)
Up in the sky (wave arms back and forth over head)
It’s big and round (make circle with arms over head) 
And I have found (thumbs to chest)
That it looks just like a pizza [lemon] pie! (make circle with hands in front of you, then take a bite)


7) The Very Lonely Firefly - Eric Carle
In one of my groups, a kid did mention fireflies when we wrote out our light list. This is the time of year when there are sooooo many of them out in our area, so most of the kids knew what they were. On each page I asked the kids "was it another firefly?!" and waited for their "nooo..." answer. Unfortunately my batteries are dead in this book, though one kid exclaimed "I have this book at home, and the fireflies DO light up!!!"


8) Two Little Fireflies
Two little fireflies land on my hand ("Blink" fingers of both hands)
One named Sally ("Blink" right hand)
One named Sam ("Blink" left hand)
Lights ON Sally! (Spread right hand open)
Lights ON Sam! (Spread left hand open)
Lights off Sally (Make right hand into a fist)
Lights off Sam (Make left hand into a fist)


9) Twinkle Twinkle Little Star
Everyone knows this one...


10) Night Light - Nicholas Blechman
A really fun guessing book. One of the kids in my second group had this book at home, so he yelled out the answers each time... Oh well! I was a little disappointed in how the book was created, in that the last page included the inside of the back cover -- which got partially covered with the book's dust jacket (which is of course taped down for library use).


11) Suncatcher craft
I'd seen a number of tissue paper suncatchers on Pinterest that used contact paper. I really didn't want to cut 60 pieces of contact paper and risk having 2-year-olds crumple/wrinkle/bend/stick together. So I searched for another idea and came up with a great one all on my own! I found a box of clear transparency sheets (remember using those with overhead projectors??), which I sliced in half. The kids took one piece and spread glue on it, then stuck down tissue paper pieces. Then they put glue on the other half and stuck it on top of the tissue-papered half. Brilliant! Beautiful! They turned out so sturdy. My daughter has hers leaning up against her window at home.
Showing how it looks with a flashlight. My club room
doesn't have easily accessible windows (basement).


Other light ideas:
What Makes a Shadow? - Clyde Robert Bulla
Moonbear's Shadow - Frank Asch
The House in the Night - Susan Marie Swanson
The Dark - Lemony Snicket
Katie's Light & Electricity Storytime



Friday, August 1, 2014

Science Craft: Rubber Blubber

Our first science experiment/craft of our Fizz Boom Read! Summer Reading Program for grades 1-6 featured Rubber Blubber (aka Homemade Gak). I found a number of recipes online, and settled on this one from Erika. I did a bit of unit conversion (my algebra teacher hubby would be proud!) to come up with how much supplies I would need for the 100 kids we expected to come through that day.
I figured I would need 2/3 cup Borax in a gallon of water, to
make the "Borax solution" ahead of time for 100+ "servings".
I set up the craft in a buffet-style format, along two counters so we could have two lines going at once. Instructions were everywhere with how much of each ingredient to place in their bag. Then the kids went to a table and started squishing their bag!
My sample, which I took out every so often to show.
 Each kid would use:

  • 1 plastic baggie (I used quart sized freezer bags, so they would be sturdy enough for all the squishing)
  • 4 spoonfuls of water
  • 2 drops of food coloring (neon colors are great!)
  • 4 spoonfuls of glue (I went through about a gallon of Elmer's School Glue, but didn't have nearly as many kids as we'd hoped for)
  • 2 spoonfuls of Borax solution

Spoonfuls was a really easy measuring system. I just made sure to keep the proportions correct from the recipe. The glue was the hardest to measure, and I often ended up adding another spoonful after kids had squished for awhile.
They never believed me when I said they needed to squish for over 5 minutes! :) My last instruction on the paper said "Even when you think you're done, MIX MORE!" I had food coloring stains on my hands that I showed them, from trying to take my blubber out of the bag before it was mixed all the way.

This craft was such a huge hit. Unfortunately there was also a day camp going on at one of the local schools that took a lot of my kids away. Parents came in saying their children were so disappointed they couldn't come, and did I have the recipe I could share? So I posted the link above to our Facebook page, and directed parents there so they could make it themselves.

I wish Borax came in smaller containers. Oh well, I bought this box myself and am using the rest at home with my laundry. :)





Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Storytime: Music & Sound

Age: 2-5 years
Time: 30 minutes

Sticking with the Fizz Boom Read! CSLP theme, I have chosen seven science topics for our summer. This week we looked at music/sound.


1) What's the weather? 
I made a weather chart for week one of summer reading, and am starting each week this summer talking about the current weather. We sang this little song to go with it, to the tune of Oh My Darling Clementine:

What's the weather, what's the weather,
What's the weather everyone?
Is it windy, is it cloudy, is there rain, or is there sun?


2) Introduce topic - music/sound
Science makes sound happen! I encouraged kids to feel their throat, then say a quiet lalala. Feel the vibrations? Your throat vibrates and invisible sound waves travel through the air, which then vibrate the little bones inside your ear and you can hear it! Yay science! (idea from Abby)


3) These Are My Glasses - Laurie Berkner
We sing this every week before reading our first book. I start by asking them to show me their glasses and their book so that they remember the signs. We sing it through twice, then I ask them to put their "books" in their lap while we read our first book.

These are my glasses (make the letter o with each hand)
And this is my book (hands together)
I put on my glasses (put "glasses" over eyes)
And open up the book (open book hands)
Now I read read read (hold book up in front of face like reading)
And I look look look (put glasses over eyes and look around room)
I put down my glasses and… (lower glasses)
WHOOP! Close up the book. (clap as if closing a book quickly)


4) Chuck's Band - Peggy Perry Anderson
A fun book about different animals on the farm forming a band as the farmer buys different instruments for them.


5) Old MacDonald Had a Farm
Do animals really play instruments?? No... but they can make music, right??
I found some really cute crocheted animal finger puppets, which I put in a tin I have that has a barn on the front. One by one they came out, and the kids loved singing this classic song.


6) Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin - Lloyd Moss
This book is pretty neat on its own (Caldecott Honor), talking about and showing different instruments in an orchestra, but I wanted to take it another step. It can be downloaded as an audio book in a few places (which costs money), but I found it also on YouTube. I hooked up my iPad to some speakers, and let someone else read the book while I showed the kids the pictures. The best part? The reading of it included the sounds of ALL the different instruments!

It was pretty long, and some of the kids got restless toward the end, so we started interacting with it a bit by counting the instruments on each page and standing up and "conducting" the orchestra at the end. When it was done I asked the kids which instrument they would like to play. After a number of them answered, I told them I had an instrument they could play right now!


7) Rhythm sticks
I took resources from Amy and Kendra. I introduced what we were going to do by saying "Each of you will get a pair of rhythm sticks! [look at parents] They will naturally start clicking them together, and that's great. I need you to help them learn to use them properly, and not clack them on each other. I want them to have the chance to try something new, but we don't want anyone to get hurt!"

After handing out sticks, I took a pair and sat down and said "You guys sound great!! Let's see how good your ears are today, let's see how well you can listen." We practiced putting our sticks on our shoulders until I gave further instructions, and we practiced making our sticks sound fast and loud, and soft and quiet. Then we did this song together:

(Mulberry Bush)
This is the way we tap our sticks, tap our sticks, tap our sticks
This is the way we tap our sticks, so early in the morning.

This is the way we rub our sticks...
This is the way we tap our knees (gently!!)...

As Kendra did, we sang the entire thing through three times, and by the end they were all right with me. Repetition does amazing things for kids.


8) Music/sound craft
I was able to get the rhythm sticks back from the kids by telling them next we were going to make an instrument that they would get to take home with them. :) Really easy shakers -- they colored on the backside of small paper plates, put a handful of dry beans in, and stapled it shut around the outside.
My 4-year-old daughter's version. She thought
to put the music note on all by herself. :) 



Other music ideas:
Violet's Music - Angela Johnson (I had this one on my list to read at the end, after rhythm sticks, but we were already at a half hour)
Jazz Baby - Lisa Wheeler
Jazzmatazz! - Stephanie Calmenson
The Happy Hedgehog Band - Martin Waddell
Crash Bang Donkey! - Jill Newton
Punk Farm - Jarrett Krosoczka
I Know a Chicken song - Laurie Berkner



Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Storytime: Water

Age: 2-5 years
Time: 30 minutes

Sticking with the Fizz Boom Read! CSLP theme, I have chosen seven science topics for our summer. This week we looked at water.


1) What's the weather? 
I made a weather chart for week one of summer reading, and am starting each week this summer talking about the current weather. We sang this little song to go with it, to the tune of Oh My Darling Clementine:

What's the weather, what's the weather,
What's the weather everyone?
Is it windy, is it cloudy, is there rain, or is there sun?


2) Where do you find water?
I told the kids our topic for the week, then asked them what some of the places are where they see water. I listed them on a piece of posterboard, to encourage some word/letter recognition.


3) These Are My Glasses - Laurie Berkner
We sing this every week before reading our first book. I start by asking them to show me their glasses and their book so that they remember the signs. We sing it through twice, then I ask them to put their "books" in their lap while we read our first book.

These are my glasses (make the letter o with each hand)
And this is my book (hands together)
I put on my glasses (put "glasses" over eyes)
And open up the book (open book hands)
Now I read read read (hold book up in front of face like reading)
And I look look look (put glasses over eyes and look around room)
I put down my glasses and… (lower glasses)
WHOOP! Close up the book. (clap as if closing a book quickly)


4) Water in the Park - Emily Jenkins
A little long, so I ad-libbed a bit. I also made a simple clock that I could move the hour hand to each time of day, to help keep the kids' attention.


5) Sink or float?
Idea from Amy and Katie. Rather than using it as a station like they did, I did the "experiment" in front of the kids. I explained what "float" and "sink" mean, then held up objects one at a time and asked the kids which they thought it would do in water. I had two crayons at the end, and purposely dropped the first pointy-end down so it would sink, then did another and gently laid it on top of the water to float. I encouraged them to find things at home (with parent permission of course!) that they could test in their own bathtub.
Duck, rock, Lego, popsicle stick, penny, crayons


6) It Could Still Be Water (nonfiction) - Allan Fowler
I'm loving these Rookie Read-About Science books. I found one to use during our moon storytime last winter, and they are at just the right level for preschool storytime. I wish the books themselves were a little bigger though, the kids had to come close for them to see the pictures.


7) The Goldfish Song - Laurie Berkner
The previous book ended with mention of water being a home for fish, which led great into one of my kids' favorite songs.


8) Water Can Be - Laura Purdie Salas
This book came out in April, and is a great simple, poetic way of telling all the different roles water can play in our lives. I highly recommend adding it to your collection if you don't already have it!


9) Water craft
I purchased some simple water painting pages from CSLP/Upstart, gave the kids paintbrushes and cups of water, and let them go at it.



Other water ideas:
This is the Ocean - Kersten Hamilton (I actually almost used this one, and thought of making a flannel board for it. Then I found the non-fiction book and chose it instead.)
All the Water in the World - George Ella Lyon
It's Raining - Gail Gibbons
Moonbear's Pet - Frank Asch
Itsy Bitsy Spider song
anything from my Underwater Storytime
markers on coffee filters, spray with water to make cool designs
water cycle bracelets





Monday, July 14, 2014

Storytime: Animals

Age: 2-5 years
Time: 30 minutes

Sticking with the Fizz Boom Read! CSLP science theme, I have chosen seven topics for our summer. This week we did the easy, generic topic of animals.

My own kids and I managed to come down with strep throat over the long holiday weekend, and while I was feeling much better come storytime, my singing and reading voice was not completely healed yet. Luckily I had a volunteer who comes on Monday evenings who had previously said she was willing to read for me anytime, and on Tuesday morning my library director was available to read. The songs were all done from cds, and I just introduced each thing we did.


1) These Are My Glasses - Laurie Berkner
My current opening song. I start by asking them to show me their glasses and their book so that they remember the signs. We sing it through twice, then I ask them to put their "books" in their lap while we read our first book.

These are my glasses (make the letter o with each hand)
And this is my book (hands together)
I put on my glasses (put "glasses" over eyes)
And open up the book (open book hands)
Now I read read read (hold book up in front of face like reading)
And I look look look (put glasses over eyes and look around room)
I put down my glasses and… (lower glasses)
WHOOP! Close up the book. (clap as if closing a book quickly)


2) What Pet to Get? - Emma Dodd  OR  Where's My Mom? - Julia Donaldson
I let my volunteer readers choose between a handful of books what they would like to read.


3) Song - I Know a Chicken - Laurie Berkner
Chickens are animals too. :) This is a favorite song for my kids. Luckily we had just enough egg shakers to go around!


4) If You're Happy and You Know It - Jane Cabrera  OR  Mommy Carry Me Please - Jane Cabrera
Again I let my volunteers choose. The If You're Happy book went over really well because it got the kids up and moving, another one I would have personally chosen for this slot is Eric Carle's From Head to Toe.


5) The Monkey Dance - Wiggles
A really easy song to act crazy and jump around and get some energy out!


6) Brown Bear, Brown Bear - Bill Martin Jr.
Both volunteers chose to end with this book. Most of the kids read it right along with them. :)


7) Animal Craft
I purchased some Color-In Masks from Nasco. The kids colored them however they wanted -- I put up pictures of some animals and we had animal books around the room for inspiration. Most just scribbled whatever colors they wanted, but some of the older ones really tried to make theirs look like animals. Tigers were popular (which is what my example was), as were the purple cats from our last book. :)



Other animal ideas:
From Head to Toe - Eric Carle
Actual Size - Steve Jenkins (I probably would have used this one myself, it's a great book for incorporating some non-fiction into storytime, as are the books below)
Whose Legs, Tail, Eyes, Nose, Ears are These? - Peg Hall
5 little monkeys
Old MacDonald
Paper bag puppets
Anything from my previous zoo storytime




Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Storytime: 5 Senses

Age: 2-5 years
Time: 30 minutes

Sticking with the Fizz Boom Read! CSLP science theme, I have chosen seven topics for our summer. This week we talked about the five senses.


1) What's the weather? 
I made a weather chart for week one of summer reading, and am going to start each week this summer talking about the current weather. We sang this little song to go with it, to the tune of Oh My Darling Clementine:

What's the weather, what's the weather,
What's the weather everyone?
Is it windy, is it cloudy, is there rain, or is there sun?


2) Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes
To introduce the topic of our five senses, we talked about some of the cool things our bodies can do, and sang this classic motion song.


3) These Are My Glasses - Laurie Berkner
My current opening song. I start by asking them to show me their glasses and their book so that they remember the signs. We sing it through twice, then I ask them to put their "books" in their lap while we read our first book.

These are my glasses (make the letter o with each hand)
And this is my book (hands together)
I put on my glasses (put "glasses" over eyes)
And open up the book (open book hands)
Now I read read read (hold book up in front of face like reading)
And I look look look (put glasses over eyes and look around room)
I put down my glasses and… (lower glasses)
WHOOP! Close up the book. (clap as if closing a book quickly)


4) My Five Senses - Aliki
A simple book that describes our senses. I had the kids point at the parts of their body each time we talked about a sense -- pointing at eyes on the page about seeing, etc.


5) Five senses flannel
This idea is from Miss Meg's Storytime. Rather than creating all new flannel pieces, I raided what I already had in my drawer and pulled out things like a bird, flower, strawberry, rabbit, and ice cream cone. Then I printed out the senses words and flannel backed them. We looked at one item at a time and I went through the list - Can you see it? Can you hear it? Can you smell it? Can you touch it? Can you taste it? and put up the correct words next to the item.


6) Rain - Manya Stojic
This book made a nice connection to last week's discussion of weather. The kids liked the big bold pictures of animals. It's a really neat book for describing how you can use all five of your senses to describe one thing.


7) Senses Hokey Pokey
You put your seeing eyes in, you put your seeing eyes out
You put your seeing eyes in, and you blink/shake them all about
You do the hokey pokey and you turn yourself around
That's what it's all about!

...touching fingers...
...smelling nose...
...listening ears...
...tasting tongue... (the kids LOVED this one, trying to sing with their tongue sticking out!)
...whole self!...


8) Senses on the Farm - Shelley Rotner
There are a couple other books in this series (Senses in the City and Senses at the Seashore), and I thought this one would be most relevant to the kids in our small town. I paperclipped a lot of the pages, choosing just two or three of each sense.


9) Senses stations and take-home activity
Instead of a craft this week, I set up five stations around the room. The kids could go to each station and do an activity related to one of their senses.
Cardboard, tree bark, smooth and rough stones,
nail file, steel wool, cotton balls, feather
Coins, jingle bells, cotton balls, LEGOs, corn, marbles
Cotton balls with lemon juice, vanilla extract, pepper, cinnamon, coffee
I managed to erase the pictures I took of sight and taste before getting them to my computer. Whoops. For sight, I listed 8 things for the kids to find in the painted mural around our room (a basketball, a rainbow, the letter T, etc.) like I did during my E is for Eyes storytime. For taste, I put out little plastic cups in three groups -- one had a few granules of sugar, another a bit of salt, and the third a tiny bit of unsweetened lemonade mix.

I had a lot of parents say they really liked the stations idea! It really reinforced what the five senses are. I also sent home a paper with some ideas of ways to use five senses at home, like describing tastes while eating and playing I Spy while on a walk.



Other senses ideas:
Five for a Little One - Chris Raschka
Senses at the Seashore - Shelley Rotner
Senses in the City - Shelley Rotner